Backwell Environment Trust volunteers co-operate to coppice deciduous woodland, improving it for Hazel Dormice by encouraging more food-rich understory to grow once more light can penetrate the wood. Gill Brown and Ian Chambers walk through deciduous coppiced woodland during a nestbox survey for Hazel  dormice. Gill Brown inspecting a nest box set out for Hazel dormice in coppiced woodland. Ian Chambers lowers a nestbox containing a Hazel  dormouse into a plastic sack held by Gill Brown before opening it fully. Hazel dormouse being gently encouraged to emerge from a nestbox placed temporarily in a plastic sack. Two young Hazel dormice, part of a record count of 14 dormice found in 40 nestboxes at this site in late autumn 2012, held temporarily in a plastic sack. Gill Brown using a spring balance to weigh a Hazel dormouse held in a plastic bag during a survey in coppiced woodland. Hazel dormouse held temporarily in a plastic bag for weighing in autumn 2012, one of a population showing healthy weights and condition ahead of winter hibernation. Gill Brown holding a Hazel dormouse in her hands to sex it by careful inspection of its genitalia. Torpid Hazel dormouse, found sleeping in a nestbox during a survey conducted in late spring 2013 which yielded just 2 animals from 40 nestboxes. Torpid Hazel dormouse remaining asleep while held in a human hand during a late spring survey. Torpid Hazel dormouse, a survivor of a long cold winter, sleeping while being weighed during a late Spring 2013 survey, with a very low weight and a parasitic Tick attached to its cheek.
  • Backwell Environment Trust volunteers co-operate to coppice deciduous woodland, improving it for Hazel Dormice by encouraging more food-rich understory to grow once more light can penetrate the wood.

    Backwell Environment Trust volunteers co-operate to coppice deciduous woodland, improving it for Hazel Dormice by encouraging more food-rich understory to grow once more light can penetrate the wood.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Gill Brown and Ian Chambers walk through deciduous coppiced woodland during a nestbox survey for Hazel  dormice.

    Gill Brown and Ian Chambers walk through deciduous coppiced woodland during a nestbox survey for Hazel dormice.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Gill Brown inspecting a nest box set out for Hazel dormice in coppiced woodland.

    Gill Brown inspecting a nest box set out for Hazel dormice in coppiced woodland.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Ian Chambers lowers a nestbox containing a Hazel  dormouse into a plastic sack held by Gill Brown before opening it fully.

    Ian Chambers lowers a nestbox containing a Hazel dormouse into a plastic sack held by Gill Brown before opening it fully.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Hazel dormouse being gently encouraged to emerge from a nestbox placed temporarily in a plastic sack.

    Hazel dormouse being gently encouraged to emerge from a nestbox placed temporarily in a plastic sack.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Two young Hazel dormice, part of a record count of 14 dormice found in 40 nestboxes at this site in late autumn 2012, held temporarily in a plastic sack.

    Two young Hazel dormice, part of a record count of 14 dormice found in 40 nestboxes at this site in late autumn 2012, held temporarily in a plastic sack.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Gill Brown using a spring balance to weigh a Hazel dormouse held in a plastic bag during a survey in coppiced woodland.

    Gill Brown using a spring balance to weigh a Hazel dormouse held in a plastic bag during a survey in coppiced woodland.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Hazel dormouse held temporarily in a plastic bag for weighing in autumn 2012, one of a population showing healthy weights and condition ahead of winter hibernation.

    Hazel dormouse held temporarily in a plastic bag for weighing in autumn 2012, one of a population showing healthy weights and condition ahead of winter hibernation.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Gill Brown holding a Hazel dormouse in her hands to sex it by careful inspection of its genitalia.

    Gill Brown holding a Hazel dormouse in her hands to sex it by careful inspection of its genitalia.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Torpid Hazel dormouse, found sleeping in a nestbox during a survey conducted in late spring 2013 which yielded just 2 animals from 40 nestboxes.

    Torpid Hazel dormouse, found sleeping in a nestbox during a survey conducted in late spring 2013 which yielded just 2 animals from 40 nestboxes.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Torpid Hazel dormouse remaining asleep while held in a human hand during a late spring survey.

    Torpid Hazel dormouse remaining asleep while held in a human hand during a late spring survey.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom
  • Torpid Hazel dormouse, a survivor of a long cold winter, sleeping while being weighed during a late Spring 2013 survey, with a very low weight and a parasitic Tick attached to its cheek.

    Torpid Hazel dormouse, a survivor of a long cold winter, sleeping while being weighed during a late Spring 2013 survey, with a very low weight and a parasitic Tick attached to its cheek.

    • Lieu : Backwell, Bristol
    • Pays : United Kingdom

The Hazel dormouse, the UK's only native dormouse, has declined greatly in the last 100 years due to loss of woodland and changed forest use. Today, many conservation groups help dormice by coppicing deciduous woodland, cutting down some trees to admit more light, which promotes a richer understorey with more leaf buds and fruit for dormice. They also set out nest boxes, which provide extra dormouse homes and allow licensed inspectors to monitor their numbers easily and to check their health by weighing them. A survey of woodland near Bristol in late autumn 2012 yielded a record number of dormice for the site, but after a very long, cold winter, numbers were very low by Spring 2013, with surviving animals in poor condition. The population had survived, though, and with continuing help here and elsewhere in the UK, the future is promising for these rarely seen, but very engaging mammals.